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ISBN:
0-9759135-0-6 
ISBN 13
978-0975913505
Library of Congress Number: 2005901265
220 pages
Perfect bind - 9x7
PD 1006
Shelving: Operating Systems/Linux Easy Linux Series
# 1

  Easy Linux Commands
Working Examples of Linux Command Syntax

By Jon Emmons & Terry Clark


Retail Price $27.95 /  £17.95 
 

Key Features About the Authors  Table of Contents
Index Reader Comments Errata
     


 
Order now at 30% off and get the free Linux reference poster! Only $19.95
(30% off)

Get the Linux Library
Three books for only $79.00 - a $128 value
Easy Linux Commands $27.95
Linux for the Oracle DBA $49.95
Oracle Shell Scripting $49.95


Linux is one of the most robust and complex operating systems ever created, and the Linux professional must master complex commands, arguments and scripting syntax.

For beginners and experts alike, this condensed book is an indispensable guide for using Linux commands. Filled with working examples, this reference will get you started fast in maintaining any Linux server.

Written by a working Linux administrator, this quick reference has working examples of all of the Linux commands that you need to manage your Linux environment.

Best of all, this great book contains all of the common Linux shell commands to allow you to quickly locate errors and monitor your filesystem environment.

 

 
 

          
                Become
                a Linux
              command
                 Guru!

Key Features

* See working examples for all common Linux commands.

* Understand how to create sophisticated Linux shell scripts.

* Learn to create and schedule complex Linux tasks.

* Receive a code depot with working Linux administration scripts.

About the Authors:
 

 
Jon Emmons

Jon Emmons has many years of full-time experience running Oracle in a UNIX environment. His Oracle experience is reinforced by his many years as a UNIX system administrator. Jon has published extensively about Oracle on his website which continues to receive acclaim from the Oracle community.

Jon's work experience includes both industry and education. In addition to his technical abilities Jon has also been called upon to teach a college course in database management systems.
 

Terry Clark

Terry Clark is an Oracle Certified DBA with more than 25 years of full-time IT experience. Certified in client-server and LAN technologies by DePaul University, Terry has extensive experience with Linux troubleshooting and tuning database networks.

An acknowledged Linux and Oracle expert, Terry has published in Oracle Internals Magazine and has over a decade of Oracle experience working with mission-critical Linux and UNIX systems. Terry specializes in Linux Oracle tuning and troubleshooting and is noted for his ability to quickly identify and correct production problems.

Terry lives in Las Vegas where he enjoys Toastmasters and Real Estate speculation.

Table of Contents:
CHAPTER 1 - Directory and File Commands
What is Linux?
The Linux kernel
The Many Breeds of Linux
Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Fedora
Ubuntu
Mileage May Vary
What is a shell?
The bash shell
Getting to the shell
A few quick tips
No news is good news
Tab completion
Repeating recent commands with the up arrow
Getting More Help
Man Pages
Info
Conclusions


CHAPTER 2 - Important Files and Directories
Directory Structure
Directory Commands
What Directory am I In?
Creating New Directories
Deleting Directories
Renaming directories
Navigating the Directory Tree
Listing Directory Contents
Disk Usage of a Specific Directory
File Commands
Creating an Empty File
A Brief Discussion about Wildcards
Deleting Files
Preventing Accidental File Deletion
Deleting Files Using File Properties
Moving and Renaming Files
Archiving directories and files
A Warning about Relative and Absolute Paths in tar
Combining Files
Displaying file contents
Displaying Beginning Lines of a File
Displaying Ending Lines of a File
Display Active Writes to a File
Display a Hex Dump of a File
Creating a Symbolic Link to a File
Remote file copy
Conclusions


CHAPTER 3 - File and Directory Security
Home Directory
Hidden “Dot” Files
Important System Files
Important Directories
Conclusions
File Security Model
File Permissions
Change File Ownership
Change Group Ownership
Change User Ownership
Changing File Permissions
Permissions on Directories
Setting Default Permissions Using a File Mask
Special modes
ACLs – Access Control Lists
Logging on to another Group
Conclusions


CHAPTER 4 - Linux Search Tools
Finding files using attributes
Using Simple ls Command Options
Sample directory
Finding the File Last Touched (Modified) in a Directory
Finding the File with the Last Attribute Change
Finding the File Last Accessed in a Directory
Finding the Largest Files in a Directory
Finding the Smallest Files in a Directory
Using the find Command
Finding Files by Age
Finding Files > Years Old
Finding Any Files Modified in the Past Days
Finding txt Files Modified in the Past Days
Find files by size
Finding Files Larger than k
Doing things with what we find
Finding txt Files < Days Old and Delete Them
Dealing with "Permission denied" in find
Finding a String within a Text File
Finding the Full Directory Path for a Command
Find the Directory Path for emacs and sort
Finding the Location of Program Binary Source Manual Pages for emacs and sort
Finding Strings in Binary Files
Find All Strings in the Binary File
Finding Occurrences of a String in a Binary File
Finding Strings in Multiple Files
Finding a File Containing a Particular Text String
Find processes
Finding Process Information by Process ID
Find Processes Belonging to a Specific User
Conclusions
CHAPTER 5 - The vi Editor
Inside vi
Editor Modes of Operation
Starting vi
Exiting vi
Changing from command to insert Mode
Saving the file
Moving the Cursor Around the File
Deleting Text
Searching for Text Strings
Cutting Copying and Pasting Text
Undo and Other Useful Commands
vi Reference
Conclusions
 

CHAPTER 6 - Shell Scripts
Programming with Linux
What is a shell?
Command Aliases
Why use shell scripts?
Getting Started with a Simple Shell Script
Shell variables
User Defined Variables
Evaluating Expressions
Using Quotes in Shell Scripts
Exit Status
The read Statement
Command Line Arguments
Redirection of Standard Input & Output
Pipes
Conditional Statements
The if condition
Using the test Command or [ expression ]
Loops
for loop
while loop
The case Statement
Linux Command Summary
Chapter Summary


CHAPTER 7 - Scheduling Jobs with crontab
The cron Daemon
crontab Options
The Format of the crontab File
Environment variable settings
crontab Command Lines
Chapter Summary
Shutting Down and Changing Runlevels
Adding and Removing Users
Get Process Status
Find Processes by Pattern or User
Display the Most Active Processes
Kill a Process
Kill Processes Using a Pattern
Kill All Processes Owned By a Particular User
Logged In User Information
Who Am I?
Switch to a Different User
Conclusion
CHAPTER 8 - Linux Administrator Commands
Linux Hardware
CPU Related Information
Display the Number of Processors in the Server
Displaying the Total RAM on the Linux system
Top Memory and CPU Users
Paging and Swapping Devices
Kernel Parameters

Chapter 8- Linux Administrator Commands
Shutting Down and Changing Runlevels
Adding and Removing Users
Get Process Status
Find Processes by Pattern or User
Display the Most Active Processes
Kill a Process
Kill Processes Using a Pattern
Kill All Processes Owned By a Particular User
Logged In User Information
Who Am I?
Switch to a Different User
Conclusions

CHAPTER 9 - Monitoring Memory and Processor
Server monitoring commands
Interactive Statistics using the top Utility
Displaying Multi-Processor Statistics
Displaying I/O Statistics
Displaying Virtual Memory Statistics
Conclusion


CHAPTER 10 - Disk and Filesystem Commands
Displaying File System Information
Creating a File System
Installing a disk
Partition the New Disk
Format the New Disk
Mount the New Disk
Working with the File System Table
LVM: The Logical Volume Manager
Conclusion

Book Summary

Index Topics:

$HOME
$HOSTNAME
$USER
bash_profile
bashrc
gtkrc
login
logout
profile
viminfo
wm_style
Xdefaults
xinitrc
Xresources
xsession
/etc/fstab
/etc/passwd
/tmp

A
absolute path
Access Control Lists
ACL
arrow keys

B
backtick
bash
bashrc
BIOS
boot
Bourne-Again Shell

C
case statement
cat
cd
chgrp
chmod
chown
command mode
CPU
cron
crontab

D
df
disk usage
dot files
du
dump file

E
echo
EIDE
elif
else statement
exit status
export
expr
F
FAT
FAT
fdisk
Fedora
FHS
Filesystem Hierarchy Standard
find
for loop
fsck


G
global variables
Gnome
grave
grep
groups
GTK

H
hda
hdb
hdc
hdd
head
hex
hex format
hosts


I
IDE
if statement
if-then-else
insert mode
iostat
 

J
JCPU

K
kernel
kill

L
less
ln
local variables
localhost
Logical Volume Manager
ls
lvchange
lvcreate
lvdisplay
lvextend
LVM
lvmdiskscan
lvreduce
lvresize

M
Mac OSX
man
meminfo
mkdir
mkfs
mkswap
more
mount
mpstat
mv
newgrp
 

N
NTFS


O
od


P
parted
passwd
PCPU
pipe
PPID
PS
PS
pwd


R
RAM
rcp
read
Red Hat
relative path
remote copy
rm
rmdir

S
SATA
scp
secure copy
set
sfdisk
SGID
shutdown
space bar
ssh
SSH
strings
sudo
SUID
symbolic link

 

T
tab
tail
tar
tarball
test command
top
touch
tree
TTY



U

Ubuntu
UNIX
until loop
up arrow
uptime
Use%
userdel


V
vgcreate
vgdisplay
vgextend
vi
vmlinuz
vmstat



W
w command
wc
whereis
while loop
who command
whoami
wildcard
Windows


X
Xterm
yank


Z
ZZ

Reviews:

New users to Linux and old-school Unix engineers alike will find value in this book. The author did a tremendous service representing this rapidly growing technology in an easy to read, easy to follow humorous format.

Page to page there are examples of basic Unix
commands and obscure Linux features available to most builds. Having built my career in deploying "Enterprise Class" Unix based solutions for today's high availability needs, it is refreshing to learn some new tricks and be reacquainted with old tools built discussed in this
book.

I recommend it to entry level and veterans alike.

-Kurt Tucker


After wading through a maze of complex Linux tomes that are geared toward experienced Unix administrators, I finally found an excellent tips and tricks guide that can walk a novice through the maze of Unix commands. This book is easy to follow and makes using Linux operating system a breeze rather than a painful austerity. Highly recommended!

- Ben Prusinski

 

Errata:

 

Learning Linux Commands Book, Easy Linux Tutorial

   

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