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ISBN
978-09916386-2-8
0-9916386-2-X
Library of Congress Number: 2009926794
214 pages:
Perfect Bind - 9.25x7.5 
PD 510
Shelving: Database/Oracle Oracle In-Focus Series # 32
 

 

Oracle Grid & Real Application Clusters
Oracle Grid Computing with RAC

Steve Karam, Bryan Jones  

Retail Price $27.95 /  £20.95

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Key Features   About the Authors Reader Comments
Table of Contents   Index Errata
       
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Oracle Grid and RAC is the first-of-its-kind reference for Oracle Grid computing. Covering all areas of Oracle Grid computing, this book is indispensable for any Oracle DBA who is charged with configuring and implementing Oracle Grid with server blades.

This text presents a complete guide to the installation, configuration and design of Oracle Grid and RAC. It supplies expert internals of shared disk technology, raw devices and RAID, and exposes the internal configuration methods for server blades. The text also demonstrates the use of Oracle Grid using the Enterprise Manager Grid control utility.

 
Key Features

* See working examples of Oracle Grid and RAC installation.

* Learn to configure Oracle Grid using Enterprise Manager.

* View the internals of shared disk technology, raw devices and RAID with Oracle Grid.

* Understand the internal concurrency, resource coordination and locking for Oracle Grid systems.

* Get examples of real-time server load balancing with Oracle Grid Controller.

* Use working scripts to monitor and tune Oracle Grid and RAC.

 

About the Authors:


Steve Karam

                   

Steve Karam is one of the few DBAs worldwide to achieve both the Oracle 10g Certified Master certification and the Oracle ACE designation, both of which he received before the age of 26.  As both a production DBA and an instructor, he has a proven track record in performance and troubleshooting on dozens of high profile Oracle systems including complex RAC environments. 

Additionally, Steve has been developing against Oracle databases for over twelve years on a variety of platforms including C, C++, Java, PHP, and Application Express.
Steve is also involved heavily in the Oracle community as the President of the Hampton Roads Oracle Users Group, Web Chair for the IOUG RAC SIG, and judge for the yearly Oracle Academy educational competition.
   

Bryan Jones

 

Bryan Jones is an Oracle Certified Professional with 10+ years of hands on experience working with Oracle. Currently Bryan works full time as a Senior Lead Oracle DBA for a Top Level Federal Government Office.  He also assists Unisys DBAs and Federal Government DBAs with RDMBS performance tuning issues.

Bryan has a Masters in Computer Science from Creighton University with a BS in Computer Science from Westminster College. He has been working with Oracle since 1997. He has extensive experience with Oracle versions 7, 8, 8i, 9i, and 10g. He has also been in charge of Database Servers that process $10 billion of transactions per year.

Bryan  has most recently worked on an 11g Grid and RAC book: Oracle 11g Grid & Real Applications Clusters.

 
   

 

Table of Contents:

Conventions Used in this Book
Acknowledgements

Chapter 1: Intro to RAC and Grid Computing

What is Grid Computing?
Where is the IT World on Grid Computing?
   What is Oracle’s Direction?
   Grid Types

Grids and Clusters
   Introduction to Cluster Technology
High Performance, Availability and Computing
   Parallel Processing
   Parallel Databases

Highly Available Databases
   The Need for Highly Available Data
   Database Availability
   Benefits of Real Application Clusters (RAC)

RAC Evolution
   Evolution from OPS
   RAC Today (10g and 11g)
   Future of Utility and On-Demand Computing

Conclusion
References

Chapter 2: RAC Architecture

The Architecture of RAC
Additional Server Components for RAC
RAC Components
Oracle Clusterware
   Online Install Guides for Clusterware and RAC
   Clusterware Features

Cluster Private Interconnect
Database and Database Instance
   instance_name vs. db_name
Database Instance
   System Global Area (SGA)
   Database Buffer Cache
          
   Automatic Shared Memory Management
          
   Program Global Area (PGA)
   Automatic Memory Management

The Background Processes
   RAC Specific Background Processes
   Cache Fusion Background Processes

Database Related Files 
   Data Files
   RAW Partitions, Cluster File System and Automatic    Storage Management (ASM)
  Concept of Redo Thread

Database Logical Objects
   Tablespaces
Cache Fusion
   Evolution of Cache Fusion
   Nature of Cache Fusion
   Benefits of Cache Fusion
   Concurrency and Consistency
   Cache Coherency
   Global Cache Service

SGA Components and Locking
   SGA – System Global Area
   Multi-Version Consistency Model

RAC Components
Resource Coordination
   Synchronization
   GCS Resource Modes and Roles
   Concept of Past Image
   Block Access Modes and Buffer States

Cache Fusion Scenarios
   Scenario 1: Read/Read           
   Scenario 2: Write/Write
          
   Scenario 3: Disk Write
           
   Block Transfers Using Cache Fusion – Example          
Cache Fusion and Recovery
   Recovery Features
Conclusion
References

Chapter 3: Storage and RAC

RAC Using Raw Storage
RAC Using Automatic Storage Management (ASM)
   Linux – ASMlib
   Windows
   Other OS – HPUX, AIX, Solaris
   Symbolic Links
Creating ASM Diskgroups
Redundancy
RAC Using NFS with Direct NFS (DNFS)
 Conclusion

Chapter 4: RAC Design Considerations          

Introduction
Designing Equipment for Real Application Clusters
What Are the Effects of Component Failure?
   Failure of the Internet or Intranet
   Failure of the Firewall
   Failure of the Application Server
   Failure of the Database Server
   Failure of the Fabric Switch
   SAN Failure
   NICs and HBAs
         
   Provide Redundancy at Each Level
   DBA and User Error Protection

Designing for High Performance
   Unscalable Design Mistakes
   Hardware Planning
   Software Planning
   Database Planning
   Better Performance on RAC
   Compartmenting Transactions to Specific Nodes
          
Proper Sequence Usage
   Oracle 11g RAC Sequence Example
Conclusion
References

Chapter 5: RAC Administration Toolbox          

Administration of a RAC Environment
What is the Difference?
   Oracle Universal Installer
   DBCA
   SQL*Plus
   SQL*Plus Conclusion

RAC Specific Tools
   Low Level Tools
   High Level Tools
   Summary of srvctl Commands

Conclusion

Chapter 6: Oracle RAC Backup and Recovery

Backup and Recovery
RAC Backup and Recovery
Maximum Availability Architecture (MAA)
   High Availability (HA)
   Disaster Recovery (DR)
          
   Physical Backups
   Logical Backups

Creating Backups in a RAC Environment
   Using Scripts for Backup
   Exporting Logical Data
   RMAN Backups
         
Conclusion

Chapter 7: RAC in the Enterprise

Executive Summary
What is RAC?
   The Oracle System
   Cache Fusion
   High Availability
         
   Scalability
   Implementation
          
   Learning Curve
          
   RAC is Transparent to Users, not the DBA
   Maximum Availability Architecture (MAA)

Deployment Considerations
   Database Consolidation          
Features and Options Only Available to Oracle 11g Enterprise Edition
Features and Options available to Oracle 11g Standard Edition
Conclusion
References

Index
About Steve Karam
About Bryan Jones
About Mike Reed

Index Topics:

A
ACMS  
Acquisition Interrupt
Active Session History
ARBn
ARCH
asm_preferred_read_failure_groups
ASMB
atomic variables
Automated Storage Management
Automatic Database Diagnostic Monitor
Automatic Diagnostic Repository
Automatic Memory Management
Automatic Shared Memory Management
Automatic Storage Management
Automatic Workload Repository
Availability

B
bigfile tablespace
Block Arrival Interrupt
Block Server Process
block written redo
Blocking Interrupt
buffer cache

C
cache coherency
Cache fusion
cache_value
CKPT
cluster aware
Cluster Ready Services
cluster_interconnect
Clusters
Clusterware
clusterware daemons
Compute Grid
consistent read
CQJ0
CRS
crs_profile
crs_register
crs_start
crs_stat 
crs_stop
crs_unregiste
current block

D
Data Block Addresses
Data Grid
Data Guard0
database buffer cache
Database Configuration Assistant
Datafile Verification
Datapump
DB block ping  
db_block_size  
db_name         
DBRM 
DBVERIFY       
DBWn  
DBWR 
demilitarized zone
Department Grid           
DIA0    
DIAG   
diagnostic_dest     
Dictionary cache          
Dictionary Cache Locks
Direct NFS       
dirty block
dirty buffer
Distributed Share Model      
Downtime Cost-per-Minute

E
EMNC    
Enqueues
Enterprise Grid     
Enterprise Manager Configuration Assistant
Event Manager     
exclusive
exp         
expdp    
EXTERNAL REDUNDANCY
External Tables     

F
fabric switch          
Failure   
fault tolerant
FBDA
fibre channel protocol         
file_mapping         
filesystemio_options           
FMON    
free buffer           

 

G
Gigabit Ethernet
Global Cache Service
Global Enqueue Service      
Global Enqueue Service Daemon
Global Resource Directory
Global Services Daemon
GMON   
Grid Architecture
Grid Computing
Grid Management Entity      
GTX0-J
gv$instance
gv$session
gv$session_wait
gv$sql_plan
gv$sqlarea

H
Host Bus Adapters

I
if_name  
if_type    
InfiniBand
instance_name     
Inter-Query Parallelism        
Intra-Query Parallelism        

J
Jnnn      

K
KATE      

L
large_pool_size    
latches
LCK0
least-recently-used list        
LGWR    
Library cache        
Library Cache locks            
listdisks 
Listener Control   
listener.ora            
LMD       
LMON    
LMS        
LMSn     
log_archive_dest 
log_archive_dest_n          
log_archive_duplex_dest
logical units          

M
MARK     
Massively Parallel Processing
Maximum Availability Architecture
Mean Time Between Failures
Mean Time To Recovery
memory bus          
memory_target      
MMAN    
MMNL    
MMON   

N
Network Configuration Assistant
node_name
null         

O
olsnodes       
online redo log group     

opatch
   
Open Grid
Open Grid Forum
Oracle Cluster Registry       
Oracle Clusterware
Oracle Notification Services
Oracle Parallel Server   
Oracle Universal Installer

P
parallel architecture
parallel execution

parallelism
            
Parallelization       
Partner Grid
past image            
pga_aggregate_target        
pinned buffer       
PMON    
pointers 
Program Global Area
PSP0      

Q
QMN      
query optimizer     

R
RAID      
rawio interface
RBAL
Recovery Point Objective
Recovery Time Objective
Reliability
Reliable Data Socket
RMSn
row exclusive
row locks
row share
RSMS

S
Scalability
Scavenging Grid
Service Registration
Serviceability        
sga_max_size       
sga_target
share lock
share row exclusive
single system image
smallfile tablespace              
SMCO    
SMON    
srvctl      
streams_pool_size               
subnet    
Symmetric Multi-Processors
synchronization   
System Change Number
System Global Area

T
Table locks
Top Cluster Events
Top Remote Instance
Transaction locks

U
udev rules
User Datagram Protocol

V
v$archived_log    
v$bh
v$instance
v$object_usage    
v$sort_usage        
v$sql_plan            
v$sqlarea              
Virtual IP Configuration       
VKTM     
Voting Disk

W
write list

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